The king is dead, long live the king.

What I’m reading a lot on social media is a very determined effort to falsely equivocate either Obama or Hillary Clinton with Trump (whether their characters, their campaigns, or their future presidencies).  In my view, this is particularly disingenuous.  To put Obama’s presence and stature or Clinton’s experience and dignity up against Trump’s impulsiveness and braggadocio and call them basically the same thing just isn’t being honest with one’s self.

This, I think, is probably the most insidious choice that voters made because it assumes a “pick your poison” baseline, that both are bad.  Further, a vote for what is “lesser of two evils” excuses all the other bad traits about Trump.  It essentially doesn’t matter how bad Trump was, is, or will be: at least he’s not as evil as “that nasty woman.”

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The Promising Future of Artificial Intelligence

The following is a guest post

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been a hot topic in the tech and innovation world as of late.  It has fueled the stuff of great sci-fi movies for generations, but only now is gaining traction in real, marketable products and services.

Yet, video games that feature AI aren’t particularly appealing; at least, not yet anyway. AI is functional, yet still lacks the flexibility and common sense of a real human. This is evident in plenty of online multiplayer games, where most computer-generated characters lack human reactions in complex situations.

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Truth and Stories

To talk about my thoughts of the excellent documentary “Stories We Tell” in any detail would be robbing you of the joy of seeing it for yourself, of letting its layers unfold like slowly blooming petals.

Generally speaking, it’s a remarkable achievement for Sarah Polley, who only recently migrated from acting to directing.  She has quite an eye for editing and honing in on her subject matter.

Ostensibly, her film is a vivid dissection of her family’s past.  Yet with each act, it becomes much more.  She balances the telling between mawkish and clinical, simply allowing each family member to tell the story of the family “from beginning to end.”

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The long happy life of a coyote survivor

“Daddy, Ebenezer not sick anymore?”  “No sweetie, he isn’t sick anymore.”

Ebenezer was more than just a pet cat.  He was a symbol of my developing adult life.  I got Ebenezer when I lived in Dallas.  My Aunt Debbie and Uncle Rick knew of a neighbor who had a new litter of kittens.  They knew just the animal lover that would make a good fit for one of them.  I was a sucker for the little orange tom’s spunk and loud caterwauling.

That first week was a trying one, as all young animals prove to be to their human caretakers.  One evening after work, he had managed to get himself completely wrapped up in small gauge solid-strand antenna wire.  As I was carefully cutting him free of the snare, unwrapping the wire from his throat and body, I knew then that I loved him.  I knew that he depended on me for his life and happiness.  And I was glad then that I had this little creature to care for.  It felt good to give joy, as well as shelter and sustenance.

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